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Monday, March 27, 2017

Articles related to Judy Dixey


St Patrick's pupils  raise funds for CAFOD
St Patrick's pupils raise funds for CAFOD

Kind-hearted pupils at St Patrick's Catholic Primary School in Kentish Town, north London, celebrated their Patron Saint in a special way this morning, with something they had been preparing for weeks. After Mass in the hall with Fr Tom Forde from Our Lady Help of Christians, they presented a cheque to CAFOD ambassador Judy Dixey for £350.16 - money which they had raised in some very imaginative ways. Children in one class were sponsored as they stood on one leg for five minutes.

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Cuban memory
Cuban memory

In November 2009, I visited Cuba on a fortnight's trip, "Meet the People", organised by Traidcraft, the champion of FairTrade. With the death of Fidel Castro, I thought it would be interesting to revisit this memory and add one striking thought which I have not heard mentioned in the coverage of his death: in every dictatorship I have visited, there are images of the Dictator plastered everywhere (eg Assad in Syria). But in Cuba, there was no cult of the personality. No images of Fidel - in fact neither he nor his brother Raoul (who had by then taken over) were visible in the streets, on or in

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Film: He Named Me Malala
Film: He Named Me Malala

This is a film which should be compulsory viewing for anyone who loves - or hates - school and education. We all think we know the story of Malala, the teenager in the Swat Valley in Pakistan; we know she defied the Taliban restrictions of girls' education and we may remember that she was shot, brought to the UK, recovered and last year was the recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. That is indeed a harrowing story. But there is so much more to her story

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CD review: BENEDICTA -  Marian Chant from Norcia
CD review: BENEDICTA - Marian Chant from Norcia

Norcia is a lovely small walled city in Umbria; many of its buildings are churches, some with exquisite wall paintings among the ruins - the city has suffered from the many earthquakes of the region. But it has so many churches because it was the birthplace of Ss Scholastica and her brother Benedict, the founder of monasticism. His Rule has guided prayer-life for millions in the nearly two millennia since it was written in the mid 4th century AD. There is a thriving Benedictine monastery in Norcia, and the monks have produced a CD of Gregorian chant, which they offer to us

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Play: Everyman
Play: Everyman

The play, Everyman, is being staged in an astonishingly energetic and inspirational production at the National Theatre. It is in origin a mediaeval morality play, not as well known as The Mysteries, which theatregoers have experienced more often in the last few years, and which are now staged annually on wagons around the towns such as York, Chester and Wakefield. Interestingly, morality plays, in the 15th and 16th centuries, with their moralising allegorical structure, had greater significance for mainstream theatre and influenced writers like Ben Johnson and Marlowe.

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Play:  Temple at the Donmar Warehouse
Play: Temple at the Donmar Warehouse

The Donmar Warehouse is sold out for this play, but I queued on Tuesday morning and got a standing ticket - it's only 95 minutes and is so absorbing, standing is not hard. Before writing this, I have pondered much about the play. I plan to buy a copy of the script, so I can absorb more, as it is jam-packed with superb nuggetty phrases, coined and delivered perfectly by the peerless cast. Does anyone remember Occupy? What were the issues? What was the dilemma which is being played out nightly on the Donmar stage?

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 In Flanders Fields
In Flanders Fields

The sun shone on us on our Battlefield tour in Easter week, and tranquil fields surrounded us. Even so, on the Ypres Salient, the water table is very close to the surface and our walks took us along some waterlogged and muddy paths. You can understand why the enduring images from World War One is of cold and wet and mud, a landscape pock-marked with shell craters, trenches and paths with slimy duckboards, men dying from drowning who had not even made it to the front, as well as thousands dying from artillery fire. April 22nd marks 100 years since the start of the Second Battle of Ypres.

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Book Review: H is for Hawk
Book Review: H is for Hawk

H is for Hawk – so many people chose it for their book of the year that it is in huge demand at the library. I got it after a wait of several weeks and had to give it back tomorrow. And I have just finished it. It is truly worth the tears, even when you shed them on the tube, surreptitiously wiping your eyes. A portrait of grief, bereavement, unadulterated incomprehensible mourning for a father, dying prematurely; and an attempt to escape from that or make sense of it, by seeking the wildest of endeavours –

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 Reith Lectures – worth spending time to read or listen again
Reith Lectures – worth spending time to read or listen again

Every year, since their foundation in 1948, significant international thinkers have been invited by the BBC to present a series of talks or lectures in honour of Lord Reith, the first DG of the BBC. For him, the BBC’s mission was to be a public service which enriches the intellectual and cultural life of the nation. It is in this spirit that the invitations are made to people who have both expertise and a vision to share concerning serious and important contemporary issues. I have had the benefit this year

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Journey to Nepal with Traidcraft
Journey to Nepal with Traidcraft

Many people dream of going to Nepal – some were dreaming when they were actually there, on the hippie trail in the ‘60s; some dream about trekking in the magnificent Himalayas or even taking a flight over Everest; some dream of finding themselves, or their god - Buddha was born in this kingdom at the top of world. I was privileged to try out a very different kind of Nepal on a trip organised by Saddle Skedaddle on behalf of Traidcraft. Traidcraft is an essentially Christian organisation whose mission is to reduce poverty through trade.

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Viewpoint: A chance to evangelise – are we missing it?
Viewpoint: A chance to evangelise – are we missing it?
Last week, attending my usual Mass, we had a Baptism. This happens quite often, which is a delight. Or it should be. Alas, for the nth time, the relatives and friends, dressed in their finery, five inch heels, low cut dresses, shiny suits, because it was an event to be followed by a long session in the pub, came in giggling, chatting, taking ‘selfies’ and photos of others – which they proceeded to do throughout the Mass. Members of the congregation did ask if they would be quiet, only to get abuse, and in one instance, just short of a fist in the face!
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Film: Philomena
Film: Philomena
Philomena, starring Steve Coogan and Judi Dench, lives up to all the expectations one had of it, and the five star reviews already heaped upon it. People coming out of the cinema were saying "that was a tear-jerker"; it is that AND some. It is tale of sex, sin and forgiveness, in the most unlikely combination. I went having been told of the unpleasant scene at the end with the harsh and unforgiving nun, Sister Hildegarde. I expected it to be full of the kind of horrific condemnation of nuns, so alien to any knowledge or experience I ever had and still have of religious sisters.
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Play review: The Herd
Play review: The Herd
Beg, borrow or steal a ticket to see this play at this theatre. It will no doubt transfer, but you need to be in the almost domestic space of the beautifully renewed/upgraded Bush Theatre in Shepherds Bush, to get the full force of the ensemble acting, the powerful emotions expressed vividly, a lived experience at close quarters. Superb actor as he is, did we expect Rory Kinnear to come out with such a piece as this, his debut play? The cast clearly respect this play, as they all came out for the weekly Q & A session,
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Visiting choirs enrich English cathedral life
Visiting choirs enrich English cathedral life
Judy Dixey from the Alleyn Singers, writes about the roving choirs that sing in some of the great abbeys, cathedrals and churches around England during holiday times.... All over the country, the great cathedrals are continuing the traditions of daily worship and prayer to the glory of God. Many of these services are sung, by choirs consisting of lay male singers and boys (and now girls) taking the upper parts. Have you ever thought what happens when they are on holiday? Do the great cathedrals fall silent?
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Play: An Instinct for Kindness
Play: An Instinct for Kindness
An Instinct for Kindness is the story of a death,  the death of the ex-wife of the writer/performer Chris Larsen.  17 months ago, he and her sister took Allyson, only just 60, to Switzerland and were present when she took the fatal dose. But it is so much more than those stark words relate. It is 75 minutes about a life lived to the full, from when Chris
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Eyewitness: Advent in Cuba
Eyewitness: Advent in Cuba
"How was it?" asks Jesus, our guide.  "Delicious, excellent, superb" are the various responses as we have just enjoyed the latest meal on our Cuban 'Meet the People'  tour, organised by Traidcraft. No problem with meeting the 'five fruit a day' target - the exotic and fresh are on our tables, breakfast, lunch and dinner
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